Tag Archives: Seagate

I’ve moved…and added a blog

The Storage Effect has moved to the newly expanded Seagate blog section of seagate.com.  Come visit me there and subscribe for any of the new Seagate blogs.

I’m also posting to a new blog at Seagate, focused specifically on IT storage called Inside IT Storage

Come join the conversations!

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Storage Effect has moved

Visit Storage Effect at its new location 

I’m excited to be moving Storage Effect into better accommodations on seagate.com.  From now on, you can find Storage Effect at http://media.seagate.com/center/storage-effect .

It’s been a blast growing the blog “off the radar”.  But taking advantage of the Seagate infrastructure will free me to focus more on the blog content and less on the site.  

For you it means exposure to Seagate’s burgeoning blog scene.  I won’t spoil the surprise, but we’re not calling the page “Seagate Blogs” for nothing.  You’ll also have easier access to videos and other cool content being generated at Seagate.

Be sure to change your Storage Effect link or subscribe to my new RSS feed to stay connected.

See you there!

Storage Effect is moving

My url is changing, but not my blog

I’m excited to be moving Storage Effect into better accommodations on seagate.com.  From now on, you can find Storage Effect at http://media.seagate.com/center/storage-effect .

It’s been a blast growing the blog “off the radar”.  But taking advantage of the Seagate infrastructure will free me to focus more on the blog content and less on the site.  

For you it means exposure to Seagate’s burgeoning blog scene.  I won’t spoil the surprise, but we’re not calling the page “Seagate Blogs” for nothing.  You’ll also have easier access to videos and other cool content being generated at Seagate.

Be sure to change your Storage Effect link or subscribe to my new RSS feed to stay connected.

See you there!

Why I froze a disk drive in my ice rink

Check it out at my new digs on seagate.com! 

Yes, I’m moving on up to a better place in the Mother Ship. 

Storage Effect’s location is changing, but not the content.  Expect to see more of the same, including the first installment of the continuing saga of my frozen Seagate FreeAgent Go portable drive. 

The new url is http://media.seagate.com/center/storage-effect . Be sure to subscribe to the RSS feed for the new page. 

Hope to see you there soon!

More raves for Seagate FreeAgent Go

BusinessWeek says it’s stylish, affordable, and simple to use

businessweek-logo

Simplicity stands out in BusinessWeek’s review of the Seagate FreeAgent Go.  So true! The biggest challenge with consumer technology in general remains its ability to be used by normal people. 

As digital content moves into every corner of our lives, the winning products will be those that meet us where we are, and don’t try to turn us all into techno geeks.

HP moves to 300GB SAS

75% less power and 70% less space than 3.5″ drives

hp-logo

HP’s making the move to 300GB 2.5″ SAS drives.  The Seagate-built drive is twice the capacity of previous 2.5″ SAS drives.  HP began shipping the Savvio 10K 300GB SAS drive worldwide to resellers this week.

This is another step in the rapid enterprise storage form factor transition underway.  2.5″ is mainstream for datacenters  starting now.

Choosing a portable drive

Seagate recently launched two portable drives with very different personalities.  Why?  One size no longer fits all.  But which drive is right for you?

Seagate FreeAgent Go – a great personal drive.  It’s the thinnest portable drive in the world, with up to 500 GB and a desktop dock.

I use the FreeAgent Go for my personal data.  I can drop the Go into a dock at work and easily use the files on my work PC.  I don’t have to mix my personal and work content, but have access to both.

Maxtor BlackArmor – a great business drive.  It’s the safest drive in the world, with government-grade 128-bit AES encryption and up to 320 GB.

I use the BlackArmor for backing up my work files.  I keep it at home as a simple disaster recovery scheme.  There is absolutely no risk of anyone accessing the data without the password, even if it were to fall out of my bag at a hacker’s convention.

Take your pick!